Tag Archives: Arts funding

How Much Is Too Much?

The New York Time published an article by Patrick Healy last week about nonprofit theatres mounting commercial productions on Broadway, partnering with commercial producers, or extending runs or remounting hits in order to increase revenue.  Nonprofit theatres have to make … Continue reading

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Seed funding?

Michael Wilkerson, on the ArtsJournal blog, made an interesting proposal to fund the nonprofit arts sector: tax for-profit cultural products and funnel those restricted funds to the nonprofit sector.  A day later, he backpedaled from the proposal, on the advice … Continue reading

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Other People’s Mission

This post originally appeared on the 2am theatre blog (#2amt). “Other people’s money” is not just the name of a play by Jerry Sterner.  It is the temptation put before an “agent” when working on behalf of a “principal” that … Continue reading

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Capacity and Innovation

After returning from the Grantmakers in the Arts Conference, a dear friend and well-respected colleague who knows I’m always looking for creative ways for my students to find funding for their projects tipped me off to Power2give.org.   Power2give allows donors … Continue reading

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Reflections on YES and NO

Arena Stage’s Polly Carl wrote a really beautiful piece on the HowlRound blog about “The Theatre of Yes.”  This was followed up in HowlRound’s weekly tweet chat (#newplay) with the question: “How do we start to say yes?” I believe the … Continue reading

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It’s Not Rocket Science

I’m teaching a unit on fiscal literacy next week in my arts entrepreneurship class, leading up to the unit on budget and finance. This content spurred me to revisit something I posted on the entrepreneurthearts blog last year.  Because it … Continue reading

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Experiencing Cuts to Arts Education

[Six days after writing this piece about cuts in my school district, the New York Times reported on the use of digital technology there: “even as technology spending has grown, the rest of the district’s budget has shrunk, leading to … Continue reading

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Commonalities and Differences

Jerusalem, War Horse, and Sleep No More have a lot in common: They’re playing to sold-out houses in New York I saw all three in a two-day binge of theatre-going last weekend They all have large ensembles of extraordinarily good … Continue reading

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Good news, good news, bad news?

Yesterday was a bad news day for the arts in South Carolina when governor Niki Haley used her line item veto to cut the state’s art commission.  But, by the end of today, arts advocates and the democratic process won … Continue reading

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Waxing Theoretical Part 6: If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em!

This is the sixth and final installment in my blog series on the theories that underly arguments against — and in today’s installment for – government funding for the arts.  I look today with some skepticism at the creative industries … Continue reading

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