Back at it (Finally)

After a summer vacation and some less fun issues (now completely resolved!) that unfortunately coincided with the very busy start of a new semester, I am back at work on my collection of  essays on the relationship between artists, money, and entrepreneurial action. The seventh essay in the collection explores what entrepreneurship means to artists, develops several case studies that illustrate these entrepreneurial principles, and then describes and analyzes several resourcefulness strategies artists employ to enable them to thrive including the development of the “portfolio career” and web-enabled patronage. As in the past, I’ll dribble some teasers out one paragraph at a time, admittedly to incite interest in the project, but also to collect feedback from you, Creative Infrastructure‘s readers. Here’s this week’s entry:

            The very term “entrepreneurship” is distasteful to many artists (and other people) for its neoliberal and/or brashly capitalist implications both historically and recently. Nevertheless, asking artists what the term means for their practice supports the perspective taken throughout these essays: for artists, entrepreneurship means directly connecting their creative work to other people, their audience. Of the forty artists who participated in a Tremaine Foundation phone survey, the plurality (nine of the forty) indicated that being an entrepreneurial artist means connecting their work with other people, while an additional three said it means keeping the buyer in mind and two others noted it means making their work accessible. Only seven said “thinking about yourself as a business” is what it means to be an entrepreneurial artist. Although I note that overall the survey was not analyzed for statistically significant correlations, those seven as a whole are younger than the rest of the group, which may indicate a shift in thinking among artists who have been exposed to arts entrepreneurship as a concept earlier in their careers. Such artists, unlike artists of earlier generations, have been, at minimum, introduced to the idea that being an independent artist means being a sole proprietor of a business, even when generating revenue is not the motivation for the creative activity of the artist.

Because I mentioned that summer vacation, I offer some eye candy:

eye candy 2

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Arts Entrepreneurship 11 through 15

Four years ago, I created a series of short videos for use in my class Foundations of Arts Entrepreneurship. I’m no longer teaching the course (and the videos themselves admittedly could use some updating) but for those of you looking for a primer on arts entrepreneurship or some supplemental material for use in your own classes, I’m making these available to the public. For expediency’s sake, I’ve decided to post the remainder of the course, modules 11 through 15. You can find modules 1-10 by scrolling down through the pages or via the search bar.

Module 11: Business models and business forms/types.

 

Module 12: Business plans and the business model canvas

 

Module 13: Professional communication

 

Module 14: Grantwriting and fundraising for artists

 

Module 15: Public policy and intellectual property basics

I hope you’ve enjoyed Foundations of Arts Entrepreneurship!

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AE 10: Entrepreneurial Decision Making and Basic Finance

Module 10 looks at two approaches to entrepreneurial finance: venture capital vs. effectuation. To understand the module you will need to first seek out and watch the Voyage Air Guitar pitch on Season 1 Episode 3 of ABC’s Shark TankPlease watch this before you listen to the short lecture.

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Foundations of AE 9: Budgeting

This ninth module of Foundations of Arts Entrepreneurship is the second of three about money: 8 is on financial literacy; 9 is on budgeting; and 10 is on some very basic concepts of entrepreneurial finance. Please note that these modules are specifically geared toward artists and arts organizations and are not a substitute for the financial or tax advice you will get from a CPA or CFP.

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Foundations of AE 8: Fiscal Literacy

This eighth module of Foundations of Arts Entrepreneurship is the first of three about money: 8 is on financial literacy; 9 is on budgeting; and 10 is on some very basic concepts of entrepreneurial finance. Please note that these modules are specifically geared toward artists and are not a substitute for the financial or tax advice you will get from a CPA or CFP.

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Foundations of Arts Entrepreneurship 7

In this companion video to Foundations of Arts Entrepreneurship 6, I discuss marketing plans, audience segmentation, and branding .

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Foundations of Arts Entrepreneurship 6

Marketing.

You know the drill: Four years ago, I created a series of short videos for use in my class Foundations of Arts Entrepreneurship. I’m no longer teaching the course (and the videos themselves admittedly could use some updating) but for those of you looking for a primer on arts entrepreneurship or some supplemental material for use in your own classes, I’m making these available to the public by posting one video per week.

This video is the first of two about marketing. In it I introduce marketing concepts; utilities of exchange; marketing approaches; and the marketing mix. The reading is from workshop materials produced by the National Arts Marketing Project and the chapter “Magnetism” from Anne Bogart’s book and then, you act.

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