The Arts Venture and Needs Satisfaction

I thought I would share the graphic I use in my class to explain that an arts venture can satisfy both the individual needs/wants of the artist and the needs/wants of a community:

Arts venture model

For more, see “Why Arts Entrepreneurship

About lindaessig

Linda Essig is director of Enterprise and Entrepreneurship Programs at the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University, including its award-winning arts entrepreneurship program, Pave: http://pave.asu.edu The opinions expressed on creativeinfrastructure are her own and not those of ASU. You can follow her on twitter @LindaInPhoenix and "like" the Pave Program in Arts Entrepreneurship at http://www.facebook.com/pages/pave-program-in-arts-entrepreneurship/386328970101 Find Pave's journal, Artivate, at http://artivate.org
This entry was posted in Arts education, Arts entrepreneurship, arts infrastructure, Uncategorized and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to The Arts Venture and Needs Satisfaction

  1. Pingback: The Double Bottom Line of Arts Entrepreneurship | Creative Infrastructure

  2. lindaessig says:

    Richard:
    Derrick Chong in his great book on arts management notes that an arts organization needs to commit to excellence and artistic integrity (as well as accessibility and accountability). “This is to suggest that merely offering the public what it wants is an abdication of responsibility” (p. 19). Just because an arts organization or arts manager is responsive to a public, does not mean it is *merely* meeting the needs and wants of that public, but it is *also* doing so, while simultaneously producing or presenting excellent art responsibly.

  3. Robert Genter in his great book ‘Late Modernism’ says this about the Modernist thinkers concerns with totalitarianism, alienation, and capitalistic consumerism.
    “The tools of sophisticated discrimination and contemplation were expelled from the minds of mass consumers in the name of profit and social control”.
    The idea that society, or “community”, even can realize what they need or want is as much of a question today as it was during Modernism’s heyday. Maybe more so.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s